Category 1 Hurricane Chris Moves Northeastward

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Tropical Storm Chris was expected to become a hurricane on Tuesday and create risky swells along the coast of North Carolina and mid-Atlantic states, the National Hurricane Center said. High surf and risky rip currents are expected to spread from the North Carolina coast to New England for several days.

Hurricane Chris is now about 205 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, with sustained maximum wind speeds of 85 mph extending at least 15 miles from the center.

There is still "uncertainty" about the possible track it will take and it would be an ex-hurricane by the weekend when it may hit the UK.

The Met Office are warning of the chance of some showers on Wednesday afternoon on what is set to be a cloudy day for long periods, with the outlook for Friday including the chance of thunderstorms. It could strengthen to a category 1 hurricane by early Wednesday morning, but is not expected to make landfall anywhere in the U.S.

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At 4 p.m. CDT Tuesday, the National Weather Service in Miami said the storm was about 205 miles (330 kilometers) east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (137 kph).

IMPACTS FROM CHRISWhile Chris won't bring us any direct impacts, swells generated by the storm will affect coastal portions of the Carolinas and the mid-Atlantic states for a few more days.

Big waves from a hurricane are rare in July in Nova Scotia, said Pete Cove, general manager of the East Coast Surf School.

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