Apple and Samsung settle U.S. patent dispute

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The Apple vs Samsung legal battle that has spanned seven years and numerous courtroom showdowns is finally over. Specifically, both companies, based on the court documents, have chose to drop and settle the remaining claims, including counter claims, in the legal battle.

This particular dispute has been going on since 2011 when Apple sued Samsung.

Now, nearly seven years since the feud begun, the companies have finally reached a settlement and the case is being closed, according to a court document.

Apple delivered the following statement last May when the case was first ruled on, and it referred The Verge to that statement once more.

"They have agreed to drop [the lawsuits] and settle their remaining claims and counterclaims in this matter", District Court Judge Lucy Koh announced today.

Neither Samsung nor Apple revealed what the terms of the settlement were. Fast forward to May of this year, and Samsung was ordered to pay $539 million in damages in the case, but it was thought that the company might, once again, appeal the decision.

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An original trial finding that Samsung violated Apple patents preceded a lengthy appellate dueling over whether design features such as rounded edges are worth all the money made from a phone.

"We believe deeply in the value of design", said the spokesperson, "and our teams work tirelessly to create innovative products that delight our customers".

In the latest trial, Apple has the burden of proof to prove that Samsung should pay the full $1 billion in damages. "It is important that we continue to protect the hard work and innovation of so many people at Apple".

Samsung's lawyers appealed the case, bringing down the compensation of $1 billion to $400 million in 2015 at the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court threw out the US$399m decision and ordered the case to virtually restart in San Jose.

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