Trump signals stiff tarriffs on metals

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The MIC calles Washington to consider the regulations of the World Trade Organization and worldwide practices before taking any decision on the matter, so as not to harm the good trade relations existing between both nations, it pointed. Trump also said the tariffs will "be for a long period of time".

European Union trade ministers have agreed they may retaliate if the U.S. slaps import tariffs on steel and aluminum.

On trade, the USA agriculture industry is particularly vulnerable to Chinese actions. The U.S. Commerce Department on February 16 recommended that Trump impose stiff curbs on steel imports from China and other countries and offered the president several options ranging from global and country-specific tariffs to broad import quotas.

The new tariffs will have wide-ranging implications for the global economy and cross-border commerce.

"We call it the whack-a-mole game, it's time for whack-a-mole to end", Dave Burritt, the CEO of the U.S. Steel Corporation said at the meeting.

Sen. Orrin Hatch told reporters he didn't believe in tariffs and warned it could create more conflict for the US.

Yet steel and aluminum make up just over 2 percent of total USA imports, according to Capital Economics.

As the Trump Administration mulls a potential tariff on steel, USA manufacturers are contemplating how it could impact their materials sourcing and supply chains.

The U.S. Commerce Department had recommended last month that Trump impose steep curbs on steel and aluminum imports from China and other countries ranging from global and country-specific tariffs to broad import quotas.

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Bacon also has introduced legislation to expand concealed-carry capabilities for off-duty and retired law enforcement officers. Chris Murphy of CT says he is "worried that this was the beginning and the end of the president's advocacy on this issue".

Trump is expected to formally announce the tariffs measure next week. "And to the extent that both tariffs and quotas drive price increases, the price increases would go to the producers, not the government".

In January, Bloomberg reported, citing sources, that senior government officials in Beijing are recommending slowing or stopping purchase of the US government bonds. Key Senate offices did not receive notice about Thursday's announcement, and the Associated Press reported that even some top White House officials were caught off guard.

On Friday morning, the kiwi rose to 93.47 Australian cents from A93.18c on Thursday.

Freeland added that it was "entirely inappropriate" to view any trade with Canada as a national security threat to the U.S.

John Lapides, president of United Aluminum Corp., said unfair competition has hurt investment in his business "and that lack of investment is reflected in a loss of jobs in America".

It's worth noting that other nations could retaliate with their own tariffs, which in turn could reduce the demand for some products built by American manufacturers.

"People have no idea how badly our country has been treated by other countries, " Trump said as he made the announcement.

The move could also force American consumers to pay more for cars and trucks, the American International Automobile Dealers Association said in a statement.

Wall Street also reacted negatively with all major US benchmark indexes closing sharply down after the announcement. On Thursday afternoon, major stock market indexes fell sharply after Trump's announcement, with the Dow Jones industrial average closing down 420 points, or about 1.7 percent. The Nasdaq composite was up 10 points, or 0.1 percent, to 7,283.

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