Monarch discusses weight of the crown in documentary

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The Queen speaks candidly about her own coronation, joking that you can not look down when wearing the Imperial State Crown, as your neck would "break".

Up until the filming of this production, even Queen Elizabeth herself was unaware of the Crown Jewels' location during WWII.

Now a BBC One programme about the crown jewels and the Queen's coronation will reveal how the historic artefacts were hidden in a deep hole following orders from King George VI.

Apparently, that iconic ride from Buckingham Palace from Westminster Abbey was "horrible" and quite the bumpy ride for her! "It's only sprung on leather, not very comfortable". The Queen uses the same crown her father, King George VI wore during his reign but through the years, she has made a few adjustments to it to ensure a better fit.

"Fortunately, my father and I have about the same sort of shaped head", the queen said. Describing the coronation as "a pageant of chivalry and old-fashioned way of doing things", she goes on to share her happiness at having the opportunity to witness one coronation, and be part of a second. "I've seen one coronation and been the recipient in the other, which is pretty remarkable", she adds.

Her gown is of white silk with bands of gold and silver embroidery.

"Not what they're meant to do", the queen quips.

Prince Charles has previously spoke of how his mother had practised wearing the 2.2-kilogram St Edward's Crown while he was being bathed.

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Royal crowns may be heavy to wear, but the feeling of importance and duty they carry clearly outweighs their heft.

The Queen, who spent her war years at Windsor Castle for safety, was aware of the general story but did not know the details until told by royal commentator Alastair Bruce. "Because if you did, your neck would break and it (the crown) would fall off", she said smiling.

The Imperial State Crown features almost 3000 diamonds, plus sapphires, emeralds and hundreds of pearls.

Mr Bruce said the head has to be kept still when wearing it and the Queen agreed: 'Yes. "They don't look very happy now".

'It's hard to always remember that diamonds are stones and so they're very heavy, ' explained Alastair Bruce, observing, 'You have to keep your head very still'.

"It's fun to see", Queen Elizabeth said".

He cited how during their conversation the crown had been slightly out of the queen's reach so he asked the crown jeweller to help move the table it was on a bit closer.

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