New Trailer and Artwork for Peter Jackson's MORTAL ENGINES!

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Fans of epic fantasy and horror filmmaker Peter Jackson have their first look at his next project, the steampunk-themed "Mortal Engines". But shortly after the film's announcement, Guillermo del Toro dropped out of directing The Hobbit for New Line Cinema, another one of Jackson's passion projects.

This film will be the directorial debut of Christian Rivers, who worked as a storyboard artist and art director on Peter Jackson's The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.

Other major motion pictures to have received this grant include Avatar, Ghost in the Shell and Pete's Dragon. "Mortal Engines", directed by local director Christian Rivers, was entirely shot in the country.

As viewers around the world get a first glimpse of the Sir Peter Jackson-produced Mortal Engines, news has come of a New Zealand government bonus for the movie.

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The move, known as an uplift, is a discretionary grant, made only when a production can demonstrate significant and lasting economic benefit for the New Zealand industry. As part of the contract, the movie will be used to promote New Zealand's screen and education interests, Variety reported.

Principal photography for the film took place over 16 weeks in Wellington this year.

Given the range of local talent involved in the process, ENZ chief executive Grant McPherson says the partnership with the film presents an opportunity to build awareness of New Zealand as a quality education destination for worldwide students.

"This film was made in New Zealand because of the depth of talent and level of technical sophistication available here", McPherson says. Set a thousand years in the future, where following the event of an apocalyptic "Six-Minute War" big cities now travel the globe on wheels, devouring opposing cities for depleting resources.

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