ISS astronauts will get their own Star Wars premiere-in space

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A trio of US and Japanese astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut blasted off from Kazakhstan on Sunday for a two-day trip to the International Space Station, a NASA TV broadcast showed. And yes, they are going to do it so while they are orbiting in space. NASA astronauts Joe Acaba, Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle of the Expedition 54 can view "The Last Jedi", while Luke Skywalker and others can understand the other new theories from the science fiction. Coverage of docking will begin at 3 a.m. on NASA Television and the agency's website, followed at 5 a.m.by coverage of the opening of hatches between the spacecraft and station.

NASA stopped its own manned launches to the ISS in 2011 but recently moved to increase the crew complement on the USA section of the ISS to four as the Russians cut theirs to two in a cost-saving measure announced past year.

NASA's concept for a deep space gateway would be the agency's first crew-tended spaceport near the Moon.

"I received confirmation from Disney and NASA sources that the crew aboard the International Space Station will be screening Star Wars: The Last Jedi, " Seemangal wrote in his tweet. "Don't have a definitive timeline yet". It has worked with SpaceX, which is also pointed to work with the National Aeronautical and Space Administration for a long time.

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Yes, getting Smith out is easier said than done. "I think it was his 53rd delivery that was the first time he'd faced Anderson". Statistics backed up Smith's claim, Malan's six overs of leg spin costing just 13 runs.

NASA is aiming to send large groups of people to space in private and public trips. Little thing like sending movies to astronauts shows how committed NASA is to do it.

The movie will be uplinked through a transmitter on Earth and will be downloaded by the ISS to watch at their comfort.

While the world indulges in a Star Wars frenzy of sorts, the hardworking folk at the ends of the Earth will struggle to join in. If "Star Wars" is to ever come close to being a reality, understanding how the human body reacts to microgravity is a focal point and NASA is conducting several experiments which simulate space like conditions to test suits that could just make the lethal stream of charged particles from the sun bounce off the astronauts.

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