No quick win for Uber in London over license loss

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Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has held talks with London's transport agency in a bid to keep the service operational.

"While we have today filed our appeal so that Londoners can continue using our app, we hope to continue having constructive discussions with Transport for London", an Uber spokesman said.

Mayor Sadiq Khan support TfL's decision and said: "All companies in London must play by the rules, if you do play by the rules, you're welcome in London".

Westminster magistrates court received legal papers from Uber this morning, outlining their appeal against TfL's decision to remove its licence after the department ruled the popular ride-hailing firm wasn't "fit and proper" to operate in London. "We are determined to make things right".

Transport for London (TfL) refused to renew the firm's licence last month on the grounds of "public safety and security implications". The pair are said to have met on 3 October, and both sides have since described the talks as "constructive".

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In an open letter last month, Khosrowshahi apologised for "mistakes" made by Uber.

TfL cited concerns including Uber's approach to reporting criminal offences, its treatment of drivers, how it conducted medical and criminal checks on drivers, and whether software employed to evade regulation was being used in London.

If Uber loses its appeal, 40,000 jobs will be on the line and although Uber and Londoners believe the company should be allowed to stick around, other members of the UK Government disagree.

His predecessor, Travis Kalanick, left the company following allegations that managers didn't adequately address reports of sexual harassment.

Uber will challenge the licence decision "with the knowledge that we must also change", he said. A petition launched by Uber to protest TfL's decision has gathered more than 800,000 signatures.

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